“The Right Match”: How Gradschoolmatch Launched One Student’s Career

The Right Match (Diverse Issues in Higher Education, September 8, 2016).

Student who found perfect match in her new graduate program.
Source: Diverse Issues in Higher Education

“The first time Alyssa Rodriguez applied to graduate school, she ended up being waitlisted. But when no spot opened up, she began work as an associate scientist at a small biopharmaceutical company in San Diego.

“My original plan was to work in [the] industry for at least two years and then apply to graduate school again,” says Rodriguez, who graduated from the University of San Diego in 2015 with a degree in biochemistry. Once I had accepted the fact that I would not be starting graduate school in fall 2015, I started my graduate school research once again that summer.”

Only this time around, Rodriguez discovered and ultimately decided to use GradSchoolMatch.com – a new website that seeks to match prospective grad school students with graduate schools.

It only took a day before Rodriguez started to see results.

“The next day, I checked my profile and was very surprised to see that I had already received messages from various graduate school program directors,” Rodriguez says. “I was in such shock that I shared the news with my mom that programs were interested in my profile.”

Rodriguez says what surprised her the most was that she could clearly see that the messages were “not spam and that truly there were assistant deans and directors on the other end of the message.”

One of those messages came from Beth Bowman, assistant director of graduate programs in biomedical sciences at Vanderbilt University.

Bowman considers GradSchoolMatch.com a “fantastic avenue for graduate programs to get to know individual candidates in the global applicant pool.”

“This sort of individual communication not only allows programs to showcase what they have to offer, but also allows a program to individualize their communication to a specific student,” Bowman says. “Personal recruiting is the best avenue to bring students to any program and GradSchoolMatch makes this ideal recruiting strategy a reality.”

Asked if the website was simply a nice thing to have or a necessity to attract and engage candidates, Bowman says: “I think more and more, this site is getting close to being a necessity for graduate program recruiting for any program interested in getting to know their applicants.

“These days, there are so many programs on the site that a student may miss out on a program that doesn’t have a presence here.”

Bowman says the website – which is free to students – helps facilitate the diversity of candidates as well.

“In my mind, this site helps to promote diversity of candidates in the program simply by being a free site and avenue for programs and candidates to get to know each other,” Bowman says. “This helps to remove any cost barrier that is typically present in a graduate program application process.”

Bowman says the website has helped Vanderbilt by increasing the number of candidates that the school can communicate with during the application process. “We are pleased to be able to pick the candidates that fit our program best,” Bowman says.

Inside the site

GradSchoolMatch.com was started by T.J. Murphy, an associate professor of pharmacology at Emory University.

He says that the website has around 400,000 user profiles and that the number is growing daily. About 30 percent of the student users are underrepresented minorities and about 20 percent are from overseas, he says.

The students come from a range of academic disciplines and specializations, Murphy says.”

Please click here to read the complete article in Diverse Issues in Higher Education (September 8, 2016).

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Here’s a Graduate School You Should Look at for a Masters Degree in Diplomacy and International Relations

It’s been over a decade since New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman famously declared that the world is flat. One thing is clear, the inexorable march of globalization is built upon a framework of diplomacy and international relations, a career specialization that demands graduate level training. Gradschoolmatch founder TJ Murphy recently sat down with Daniel Kristo, the Director of Graduate Programs at Seton Hall University’s School of Diplomacy and International Relations to learn more about the niche.

TJ Murphy: Thanks for sitting down with us to discuss how your graduate programs might fulfill the interests of people looking into careers in diplomacy and international relations.

Daniel Kristo: Thank you for the opportunity.

Daniel Kristo, MA-MS, Director of Graduate Admissions
Daniel Kristo, MA-MS, Director of Graduate Admissions

TJ Murphy: I’d like to start by asking who, exactly, is the type of person who should be looking at your programs, in terms of their career interests and academic backgrounds?

Daniel Kristo: We are asked this question frequently.  The simple answer is: “there is not one unique profile that fits all” as the School of Diplomacy attracts a diverse candidate pool.  Last year alone we invited graduate candidates from 17 countries and from 20 US states.

Applicants to our graduate programs come from over 60 undergraduate majors…not just ‘political science’ or ‘international relations’.  About 50% of our incoming class has more than two years of professional experience post-Bachelor’s degree.  The School also offers dual graduate degrees that combine ‘diplomacy’ with business, law, communication, public administration and Asian studies; these additional options attract students from various walks of life.  

Seton Hall School of Diplomacy and International Relations Alumni
Seton Hall School of Diplomacy and International Relations Alumni

TJ Murphy: Where are your program graduates heading off for work?

Daniel Kristo: Many perceive ‘diplomacy’ in direct correlation with careers in government or at the United Nations for instance.  However, our alumni outcomes show that diplomacy and international relations has a wide range of applicability in the field in all three sectors…in terms of sectors, 40% are in the private, 22% are in the public and 38% are in non-for-profit.   

Our most recent graduating class listed the following top employers: U.S. Department of State, the Permanent Mission of Japan to the United Nations, the New Jersey Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, Amnesty International USA, the NGO Working Group on the Security Council, the Drug Policy Alliance, Booz Allen Hamilton, JP Morgan Chase and Chemonics International.   

TJ Murphy: I think most of us can imagine how diplomacy specialists might operate in public and non-for-profit, but what about in the private sector? Can you provide an example or two of the kind of work your private sector graduates do?

Daniel Kristo: Sure. The private sector offers various paths.  One of our MA specializations is ‘International Security’; students with an interest in this specialization often gravitate toward a career path in intelligence.  There are various private companies like Booz Allen Hamilton (BAH) who value our student profiles, since often BAH contracts with government agencies on defense projects that may even require security clearance.

We see an increasing interest in ‘country risk’ as large insurance agencies have specific divisions that provide country risk assessments.

Other examples include Marsh International (Public-Private Partnership Development), CNN (News/Research), Reuters (Business Development) and more.

“Your program seems to put a great deal of effort into career development. That’s a key signal of a student-centric program culture, which I applaud loudly.”

TJ Murphy: What kinds of projects might your graduates work on while employed by a firm like BAH? Analysts? Problem solvers? People in the field?

Daniel Kristo: Analysts work in intelligence analysis and project management that often are confidential in nature. Key skills that are valued include: effective writing, research analysis, data interpretation and the ability to translate data into effective communication tools in a concise manner.

TJ Murphy: So the program curriculum is focused on building core competencies in those areas?

Catherine Ruby, PhD, Director of Internships and Career Development
Catherine Ruby, PhD, Director of Internships and Career Development

Daniel Kristo: Exactly – our MA curriculum, for instance, incorporates a research methods course to help students develop effective quantitative and qualitative research skills that are needed throughout the graduate program and beyond.  Professors are keen on developing students’ writing skills.  Professors even stimulate students to write op-ed’s and publish them as individual authors or as a members of a team.  Students have taken advantage of the faculty mentorship; they have successfully published in various outlets, including: International Policy Digest, PassBlue and more. MA candidates are also required to complete at least one internship course, with the option to add a second internship.  These efforts are facilitated by our Director of Internships and Career Development.

To date students have interned in more than 600 internship partner institutions in 67 countries around the world.  Students truly have the platform to apply their in-classroom knowledge and test it in a real-world environment.S Power 3

TJ Murphy: It’s hard to be in graduate school–no matter the field–and avoid opportunities to deepen one’s writing and analysis chops.  Your program seems to put a great deal of effort into career development. That’s a key signal of a student-centric program culture, which I applaud loudly. What’s driving you guys in this regard?

Daniel Kristo: Thank you for the comment and great question. Overall the MA in Diplomacy and International Relations is tailored to prepare candidates for the real world, although a small percentage continue on to pursuing a PhD program in a related field. The driving force is two-fold: (1) personal attention is something that we pride ourselves on since the founding of the School, which is the first school in international relations to be launched after the Cold War; (2) the market indicates that employers value a candidate with professional experience vs. one who was entirely focused in academia.

TJ Murphy: But it takes effort–and resources–on the program’s part to build a career development ethos and infrastructure. I get that employers like what they like. My question is why are you guys delivering? Why did this become important to you?

Daniel Kristo:  In addition to our values-based long-standing culture, the School’s intimate size allows us to deliver on our commitment to personalized service – with an average classroom size of 15 students, there is a much more dynamic interaction between students and professors.  

I mentioned earlier that our Director of Internships and Career Development works one-on-one with students to help develop their professional profiles during the program, while our Director of Professional Services is someone who students get to know as they finalize their post-graduation plans.  

The idea of the internship is to ‘test the waters’ and see if you are compatible within an industry that you thought you were interested in from the beginning.  For some students the internship experience serves as a validation; they will continue to work in the same field or will change gears and try something different.  The ability to have an existing platform that allows that kind of experimenting is a plus.

TJ Murphy: Rotation models are common for doctoral programs but that’s fairly unusual for master’s programs, where the dominant model in graduate admissions is for a student to differentiate BEFORE enrolling. That flexible method of student development is unusually student centric.

Daniel Kristo: We cater to our graduate audience, which again is a diverse one.  We do have candidates who apply with less than two years of experience and come from that BA-to-MA transition; in which case we do ask for a sense of clear direction – that will be developed further during graduate studies. Our MA program offers 13 functional and regional specializations – students are required to choose two out of 13. By specializing within the MA program, students are developing a niche that will distinguish them from other candidates when making the transition to full time employment post-graduation.

TJ Murphy: I see your enrollment is about 110. How are they distributed between your various degree programs?

Daniel Kristo: 90% of the graduate class consists of MA candidates as our graduate certificates in United Nations Studies and Post-Conflict State Reconstruction and Sustainability (online program) were launched in the last couple of years. We do not offer a PhD program.  However, I am happy to announce that the School is launching a new Executive MS program in International Affairs catered towards a more mature audience, experience wise. Also, in collaboration with the Seton Hall School of Health and Medical Science we are launching this fall 2016 semester a graduate certificate in Global Health Management.

“I advise applicants to describe previous accomplishments, future career goals and why they believe the MA program will serve as ‘a bridge’ between the two.”

TJ Murphy: And you use a rolling admissions process, is that correct? Again, a student-centric device. Perhaps you’d like to explain briefly how that works for you?

Daniel Kristo: Overall we offer rolling admissions with preferred deadlines of March 31st (for fall entry) and October 31st (for spring entry) – the deadlines correlate to our scholarship opportunities, which are merit-based.

TJ Murphy:  So the best advice is to apply early to have a shot at these scholarships?

Daniel Kristo: Yes!

TJ Murphy: Perhaps you can explain your application process and your role. Most people just beginning their graduate school search don’t really understand how the process works, or why the people who run the program really want to reach out and communicate with prospects.

Daniel Kristo: As the Director of Graduate Admissions my job is to work closely with applicants in putting together a competitive application prior to presenting it to the admissions committee. 

We ask for a 1-page, less than 500 words statement as it forces the applicant to write in a concise manner.  The statement serves as a writing sample as well, therefore it needs to be a meaningful well-written piece.  There are various ways to approach the statement.  Typically, I advise applicants to describe previous accomplishments, future career goals and why they believe the MA program will serve as ‘a bridge’ between the two.

TJ Murphy: I’m sure applicants would learn the value of concise writing if they first had to read a bunch of applications! Haha! Sorry, that’s an admissions committee insider’s joke.

What’s most interesting in all of that is how you describe your role: “to work closely with applicants”.  Too few of the people who are considering graduate programs understand our role is to help them be stronger candidates. They don’t do themselves any favors by not reaching out ahead of deadlines.

Daniel Kristo: As a former graduate student, I understand the journey of researching and choosing the right graduate program.  Because of this understanding, it comes naturally to provide as much value-added information which helps applicants make an informed decision.  The rewards are many – I do get to meet fascinating individuals with impressive yet touching backgrounds.

TJ Murphy: This has been very thorough and I’m sure it will prove to be a great resource for people considering graduate school opportunities in Diplomacy and International Relations. We see some data on Gradschoolmatch that points to fairly high interest in “international” fields of study. I have just one last loaded question:

Daniel Kristo: Yes?

TJ Murphy: I imagine that climate change will drive a lot of international conflict in the coming decades as nations react to a world of changing resources forced by environmental shifts. Does your School see the same?

Daniel Kristo: Yes!  

Seton Hall University has been acknowledged by Washington Monthly as a top university in the US for ‘contributing to the social good’, which is in alignment with our mission and work here at the School of Diplomacy.  

Philip Moremen, Ph.D, Associate Professor
Philip Moremen, Ph.D, Associate Professor

The School of Diplomacy is a strategic partner of UNA-USA, now part of UNF (United Nations Foundation).  Together last year, as the United Nations turned 70…and prior to the UN Climate Change Conference we hosted a presentation led by our own expert, Dr. Philip Moremen, who specifically covered this question and other related topics. Climate change is affecting various areas of human life…from economic to population shifts…to raw materials/resources’ scarcity – such challenges require a deep understanding of local markets and the global impact. We are proud to prepare servant leaders who possess both skills of service and leadership; it is our goal to continue to enhance the learning culture that is in sync with changing landscapes at the global level.

This year we are launching a new scholarship initiative, which will enable candidates from around the world to submit a ‘challenge’ proposal in the context of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s).  This is a great opportunity for prospective students to come up with practical solutions in response to global challenges.   The idea is to reward student recipients for innovative thinking and help them further develop their ideas during their graduate studies under the mentorship of faculty members and/or senior administrators – stay tuned for more details.  Students at the UN Summer Intensive Program in NYC

TJ Murphy: It sounds like people can launch very important and fulfilling careers from your graduate program. Hard to do much better than that. Thank you so much for sharing your time with us today.

Daniel Kristo: Thank you for the opportunity TJ; we value the Gradschoolmatch.com platform and the high quality students we have had the pleasure of interacting with.

TJ Murphy: Trust me, it is gratifying to learn about programs such as yours, and the important role they play.  if Gradschoolmatch introduces you and your program to that one person who someday prevents some big nasty international conflict, I’ll be very fulfilled.

Daniel Kristo: Let’s hope so.

Use Gradschoolmatch to Connect directly with Daniel Kristo and Seton Hall’s programs in Diplomacy and International Relations.

For more information about the School of Diplomacy and International Relations, visit their website, or follow them on facebook and twitter.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Degrees in Law: Delaware Law School Offers MJ Graduate Programs in Compliance

student-book-computerThe flip side of government regulations and legislative action is compliance. Several industries are subject to complex rules and regulations and depend upon employees with specialized expertise in compliance. And, to no surprise, there are graduate degrees in law for that!  

Although most people understand the JD degree is offered for those seeking to practice the profession of law, not all degrees in law are JD’s. And the JD is not necessarily sufficient on its own for specialization in the niche area of compliance.

Gradschoolmatch founder TJ Murphy sat down for a chat to discuss this with Eileen Grena, Assistant Dean at Widener University Delaware Law School, along with Pam Kroh, Assistant Director of Delaware Law’s Master’s in Jurisprudence (MJ) graduate programs in compliance. At Delaware Law, one can earn an MJ in either business/corporate compliance, in health care compliance, and, now, even in higher education compliance.

We discuss these programs, who they are intended for, and the career paths that these programs can best serve.

TJ Murphy: Thanks, Eileen and Pam, for sitting down with Gradschoolmatch today. We’re big believers in specialization in the graduate school space. Why do you offer degrees in law in these areas of compliance?  What niche in the graduate school universe do they fill?

Eileen Grena: Our master’s degrees in compliance offer an alternative for graduate students who may have been considering law school, but have decided against it.  Earning a master’s degree from a law school can result in a career just as satisfying as that which a law degree can provide, and can open up opportunities for positions where the students use the legal knowledge they have gained, without having to take a bar exam.   

Pam Kroh: While our programs are not a prep course for the certification exams, our master’s of jurisprudence degrees in compliance enable students to receive the eligibility required to sit for a certification.  The requirements to sit for the certifications include 1500 hours of work experience and 20 continuing education units.  Many students new to the compliance field do not have 1500 hours of work experience yet.  

Therefore, these requirements are waived for our students who successfully complete our compliance degrees. This waiver was accomplished through our accreditation by the Compliance Certification Board. Certifications are available in healthcare compliance, corporate compliance, and global compliance.  These certifications are now leading the way as an industry standard for compliance professionals.  

Successful graduates can look forward to careers as Chief Compliance Officer, Compliance Training Manager, Director of Compliance, Compliance Specialist, and much more in health care organizations, corporations, international companies, government agencies, small businesses, and more.

TJ Murphy: So are you saying that board certification is required for individuals working in these compliance capacities?

Eileen Grena: No, it is not a requirement, but is quickly becoming an industry standard for success and advancement within the field.

TJ Murphy: Would you like to attract students who are already working in compliance, or those who would like to shift from some other career into that field?

Pam Kroh: We would like to educate both students new to the compliance field and students who currently work in the compliance field about our offerings.  By offering both a full two-year master’s degree or a one-year shorter graduate-level certificate we can accommodate those with less experience seeking the initial knowledge of compliance or those with more experience seeking to enhance their credentials.  Further, we offer more than 25 compliance courses to choose from, for students who are simply seeking to enrich themselves by taking one or two, and up to three classes, to enrich themselves, without fully matriculating.  These enrichment courses for students who do not wish to matriculate, can still help those students gain knowledge that can contribute to their preparation for taking a CCB exam.

TJ Murphy:That sounds like a versatile approach….and I use versatility as a synonym of student-centric approach. The idea that the program is flexible because the students they wish to train need that flexibility.

Pam Kroh: Yes, that’s exactly right.  Not every student comes from the same background, or has the same goals, so we offer a variety of options to enter into the program so they can personalize their experience.

TJ Murphy: Can you explain why education in compliance works so well within a law school framework; and not within a framework of a medical, business or nursing school, for examples?

Eileen Greta-Piretti JD RN, Assistant Dean
Eileen Greta-Piretti JD RN, Assistant Dean

Eileen Grena: Sure.  Education in compliance works well in a law school framework because compliance programs are created as a result of the many laws and regulations that govern business and healthcare organizations.  So in addition to teaching our students  the elements of a compliance program and how to build that program, we provide our students with knowledge of the U.S. court systems, where our law comes from, how to find the law, and how to read, interpret, and analyze the law so that they can then apply that legal knowledge, and the specific laws impacting their industry, to their own organizations.  Delaware Law School in particular has an established, nationally-recognized reputation in both corporate and health law education and through faculty who are both attorneys and certified in compliance, students gain practical skills and legal experience.

TJ Murphy: Let’s focus in on the healthcare area for a moment.  What are some examples of people who work in healthcare who would need or want compliance education?

Eileen Grena: There are many different positions in healthcare that would benefit from compliance education.  Some healthcare employees may want to use the education to transition from practicing clinical healthcare to an administrative role, while others may already work in the administrative role and because there are so few higher education programs that teach compliance, they will want to use the knowledge to expand their current role.  

For example, nurses may want to move away from patient care to a compliance role or, for example, a nursing home administrator may need to enhance his or her current knowledge.  Healthcare professionals working in hospital compliance, privacy, nursing homes, regulatory affairs, pharmaceutical, information management, records management, risk management, quality assurance, health insurance, medical device manufacturers, and more can benefit from compliance education to stay abreast of the fast-changing regulations that impact daily healthcare practice.

TJ Murphy: Yes, nothing in healthcare seems static. Remember HMO’s? Are any areas “hotter” than others in terms of higher demand for compliance expertise? Has the Affordable Care Act had a measurable impact on the need?

Eileen Grena: Absolutely, the ACA has had a huge impact on this need.  As healthcare organizations struggle to interpret and enforce the ACA and other regulations like the Sunshine Act and ICD-10, a student with a degree in compliance from Delaware Law will have spent a considerable amount of time analyzing these regulations in an effort to prepare to assist their organizations with understanding and implementing these regulations.  The healthcare industry has become perhaps the most regulated in the United States, so the health law field has become a dynamic and complex area of law.  Having attorneys teaching our students about these laws is an enormous benefit to their learning experience and legal knowledge.

TJ Murphy: Switching gears a bit, you also offer a program focused on corporate regulations, but that also includes the non-profit and government areas as well. Between these and healthcare, what is the relative appetite and interests out there for workers?

Pam Kroh, Assistant Director, Graduate and Compliance Programs

Pam Kroh: Our student population has been consistently equally mixed with both healthcare majors and corporate majors.  While the healthcare industry is extremely large, the need for corporate education is just as important due to the increased financial and business laws that have come along in recent years as a result of scandals like Enron and Worldcom.

Eileen Grena:  Additionally, corporate education can be helpful to those working in a variety of settings that vary from large chain stores to global companies and even to small businesses.  Regardless of size, industry, or location in the world, companies should be cognizant of risk management, corporate fraud, and the regulations that guide companies, and how to create a culture of compliance and ethics within their organization.  Delaware Law is located in the unofficial “corporate capital” of the United States, and with more than a million companies, including almost 2/3 of Fortune 500 companies incorporated in Delaware and Delaware’s preeminence in corporate law, there is no better place to study the law relating to corporations.  The increasing complexity of national and international business is driving a growing demand for professionals with advanced legal expertise.

TJ Murphy: I’d like to take that last line and circle back to one of your first comments, about students choosing programs like yours rather than traditional JD’s.  Is this the new normal in the field of law? The demand for legal expertise didn’t just disappear when the demand for the JD fell a few years ago. Do you believe the MJ degrees and certificates are the way that demand will be filled moving forward?

Pam Kroh: We believe compliance is the new normal, and professionals are needed at every level from master’s to JD.  It is based on each organization’s need as to whether they require a licensed attorney or a compliance professional with a master’s degree.  The compliance field is growing so rapidly that there are many positions available to provide individuals with these varying degrees the opportunity to find a role that suits them the best.  Delaware Law offers specialized knowledge and a curriculum in compliance that provides options for both those who seek and/or have a law degree and those who do not wish to pursue a JD.

delaware law school outside

TJ Murphy: Your compliance programs are online. How integrated into the Widener University Delaware Law School community do your students feel?

Pam Kroh: While our programs provide online learning, it is not by any means independent learning.  Our students communicate electronically with their classmates every week within their courses through discussion threads.  Additionally, our faculty members hold regularly scheduled video web conferences where students interact live with their instructors and classmates.  Our faculty members are dedicated to the success of their students, and often stay in touch with their students long after the student has completed their course.  Students are welcome and encouraged to remain in touch with their faculty who are happy to provide mentorship and advice into the future.  

Eileen Grena: We remain in close contact with our online students on a regular basis.  Both of us, along with other faculty members, and students attend several of the same national compliance conferences every year and this provides an additional opportunity to interact and network with our students and gives them the opportunity to meet each other in person.  Each year, many of our online students attend our graduation commencement ceremony on campus in Wilmington, Delaware.  While this is not a bricks and mortar program, our students are a part of our academic community.  Our strong alumni play an important role as well, in communicating with both potential and current students to provide mentoring and personal career experiences.

TJ Murphy: Sounds like happy students and successful graduates! One last question: How does Delaware Law stand out relative to other schools where one would go for compliance specialization?

Pam Kroh: We are unique in that we offer an entirely online CCB-accredited program with the many options varying from the master’s degree to graduate-level certificate to enrichment courses.  In addition to the variety of degree levels from which a student may choose, we are further unique in that we offer several concentrations which include healthcare compliance, corporate compliance, global compliance, and we continue leading the way in compliance education by now offering higher education compliance. The variety of options allows students to tailor their educational experience to fit specific needs and goals. Delaware Law School is also the proud recipient of an award for excellence in creating compliance education.  Additionally, Delaware Law School stands out amongst others as an American Bar Association-approved law school.

TJ Murphy: This all sounds fascinating. One of the real pleasures we have at Gradschoolmatch is discovering all of these niche specializations that exist out there in the knowledge economy, and how great schools and programs exist to produce graduates with the expertise to fulfill the demand.

I’m also a firm believer in the idea that people looking for graduate degrees don’t always know what they are looking for until they see it for the first time. I imagine some of that will happen following this conversation because this sounds like a fascinating field of work. Thanks so much for your time today!

Eileen Grena: TJ, thank you so much for taking the time to highlight our programs.  You had excellent questions, which allowed us to truly explain our niche programs and we greatly appreciate all your support and excitement about educating graduate students about us. Have a wonderful weekend!

TJ Murphy: Thank you. You too!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Grad Program Cuts Costs and Increases Applicant Pool with Innovative New Process

DALLAS – April 13, 2016 – During a time of tight budgets and increasing demands, the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center’s Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences has found a unique way to recruit new students. The program is now attracting prospective students through Gradschoolmatch.com; the online platform connects students and interested program administrators and then allows them to start a two-way conversation.

“Gradschoolmatch.com has allowed us to find more candidates at roughly half the cost it takes to travel and engage students on their home campuses across the country,” says Assistant Dean Lisa Gardner, Ph.D. “It’s definitely helping us attract majority and minority students as well as those from overseas. The student profiles are easy to read, and when a student includes his or her research experience, it is highlighted in a useful way.”

Gardner says the applicants are very competitive, with a large percentage receiving interviews and offers of admission.

Gradschoolmatch has discovered that the typical student researches only eight programs of the hundreds he or she may otherwise choose. The service has found that identifying prospects costs as little as $1.06 per student, a great savings over traditional methods.

The proprietary matching system was founded by TJ Murphy, Ph.D., a who teaches at Emory University in Atlanta. He envisioned a simple and inexpensive way to seek out the prospects his program needed anywhere in the world. He and his colleagues built an algorithm that matches students with graduate programs.

The system also allows programs to highlight their academic fields, rankings, stipends, scholarships, application deadlines and other details. www.gradschoolmatch.com/graduate_programs

Gradschoolmatch’s unique messaging service allows prospective students to communicate directly with grad school faculty so they can get questions answered and start to build relationships. National Association of Graduate Admissions Professionals research indicates personal engagement drives recruiting success.

“The coolest feature of all is that the schools can show interest in you, even if you have not yet found out about them, which is unprecedented in the search for a graduate school,” says Teague Cole, a student at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

In addition to UT Southwestern Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, graduate programs from over 100 universities use Gradschoolmatch, including Georgia State University, the University of Arizona, Columbia University, Vanderbilt University, Washington University, University of Virginia and many more.

There is no cost for students to use Gradschoolmatch, and currently more than 375,000 students are part of the process.

###

MEDIA CONTACT:

Adam Shapiro

Adam.Shapiro@ASPR.hz

202-427-3603

 

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

STEM Research and Career Symposium

Emory University, Laney Graduate School


September 18-20, 2016

For students interested in a PhD, MD/PhD, or Postdoctoral Fellow positions.


emory stem symposiumConvened and organized by Laney Graduate School, the symposium will bring faculty advisors and their students from diverse backgrounds to the Emory University campus for two days of shared research presentations and for networking, mentoring, and recruitment. Participants will include outstanding undergraduates intending to pursue the PhD or MD/PhD degree and graduate students seeking postdoctoral opportunities. Faculty advisors are also encouraged to attend and learn about the opportunities Emory offers.

Students are required to submit abstracts of their research for review by a selection committee of Emory training faculty from STEM-related programs, including those doctoral programs that align with the MD/PhD program. A wide breadth of abstract categories are covered (see STEM Symposium Brochure at right for details). Ten students will be selected to give oral presentations, and all others will present their research in a poster session.

There will be ample opportunity to meet with faculty and students of the participating programs, including training grants programs. Breakout sessions will cover topics relevant to students at this stage of their careers and advisors of such students.

Trainees from diverse backgrounds (to include ethnicity, race, economic status, disability, educational experience, first generation status, and in some cases, gender) are eligible to apply for diversity travel awards that will provide for travel and housing for the student and possibly her/his advisor.

All meals are covered.

Application deadlines: May 1, 2016. Students conducting their first initial research project this summer can apply on Aug 1, 2016

Click here for more information and to apply.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Georgia State University Takes Leadership Role in Attracting Graduate Students with Breakthrough Online Technology

April 6, 2016 – Graduate schools across the country, facing increased competition, are looking for new ways to attract interest from prospective, diverse students. Every graduate school program at Georgia State University now has access to a method that is already popular for online dating — a match service that connects students and interested programs and then allows them to start a two-way conversation.

Georgia State is an enterprising urban public research university in downtown Atlanta. Its College of Arts and Sciences is one of the programs in particular that has embraced Gradschoolmatch.com (www.gradschoolmatch.com) because of its success to date.

“I’m definitely seeing activity; some of our lesser known programs are seeing more bookmarks from prospects than they would visitors at a grad school fair, so we know it’s working,” says Lita Malveaux, assistant director, Georgia State University Office of Graduate Services, College of Arts and Sciences. “It’s typical to liken recruitment to a funnel and while we have had success converting applicants to enrolled students, we’ve had a harder time finding and converting prospects to applicants and that’s where Gradschoolmatch comes in…they’ve met us where we need help the most, at the top of the funnel.”

The College of Arts and Sciences has even built a direct inquiry page on its website that links directly to Gradschoolmatch: https://www.gradschoolmatch.com/universities/947-georgia-state-university/inquiry. This special features allows prospective students to have a connection to faculty through Georgia State’s own website without needing to go through a third party.

Gradschoolmatch research shows that the typical student only bookmarks eight programs of the hundreds they might choose otherwise. The service has found that identifying prospects costs as little as $1.06 per student, a great savings over traditional methods.

The proprietary matching system was founded by TJ Murphy, Ph.D., who teaches at Emory University and envisioned a simple and inexpensive way to seek out the prospects his program needed anywhere in the world. He and his colleagues built an algorithm that matches students with graduate programs.

The system also allows programs to highlight their academic fields, rankings, stipends, scholarships, application deadlines and other details. www.gradschoolmatch.com/graduate_programs

Gradschoolmatch’s one-of-a-kind messaging service allows prospective students to communicate directly with grad school faculty so they can get questions answered and start to build relationships. National Association of Graduate Admissions Professionals research indicates personal engagement drives recruiting success.

“The coolest feature of all is that the schools can show interest in you, even if you have not yet found out about them, which is unprecedented in the search for a graduate school,” says Teague Cole, a student at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

In addition to Georgia State, other schools using Gradschoolmatch include Vanderbilt University’s Graduate Programs in Biomedical Sciences, University of Virginia School of Architecture and Baylor College of Medicine.

There is no cost for students to use Gradschoolmatch, and currently more than 375,000 students are part of the process.

 

###

 

MEDIA CONTACT:

Adam Shapiro

Adam.Shapiro@ASPR.hz

202-427-3603

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

University of Arizona Graduate College Now Offers Largest Number of Programs on Breakthrough Online Technology

Gradschoolmatch.com Aims to Help University Reach More Diverse Applicants

 

April 6, 2016 – The University of Arizona Graduate College, one of the nation’s top 20 public research institutions, is currently offering more programs for review and matching on Gradschoolmatch.com than any other university in the country.

U of A has more than 250 programs available on the platform. Gradschoolmatch uses a one-of-a-kind process similar to online dating — the service connects students and interested program administrators and then allows them to start a two-way conversation. The founders say it’s the online version of a graduate school fair.

“Since we signed up we have been impressed with the number of matches we’ve made,” says Stephanie Adamson, director of recruitment, University of Arizona Graduate College. “I find the site very attractive and easy to use.”

Gradschoolmatch research shows that the typical student only researches eight programs of the hundreds he or she may otherwise choose. The service has found that identifying prospects costs as little as $1.06 per student, a great savings over traditional methods.

The proprietary matching system was founded by TJ Murphy, Ph.D., who teaches at Emory University and envisioned a simple and inexpensive way to seek out the prospects his program needed anywhere in the world. He and his colleagues built an algorithm that matches students with graduate programs.

The system also allows programs to highlight their academic fields, rankings, stipends, scholarships, application deadlines and other details. www.gradschoolmatch.com/graduate_programs

Gradschoolmatch’s unique messaging service allows prospective students to communicate directly with grad school faculty so they can get questions answered and start to build relationships. National Association of Graduate Admissions Professionals research indicates personal engagement drives recruiting success.

“The coolest feature of all is that the schools can show interest in you, even if you have not yet found out about them, which is unprecedented in the search for a graduate school,” says Teague Cole, a student at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

In addition to U of A, graduate programs from over 100 universities use Gradschoolmatch including Georgia State University, the University of Texas at Southwestern, Columbia University, Vanderbilt University, Washington University, University of Virginia and many more.

There is no cost for students to use Gradschoolmatch, and currently more than 375,000 students are part of the process.

###

MEDIA CONTACT:

Adam Shapiro

Adam.Shapiro@ASPR.hz

202-427-3603

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail